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Ayreheart Plays Early Music

Performing as a quartet (vocals, two lutes, colascione and percussion) Ayreheart offers "Will You Walk the Woods so Wild" a program of Renaissance music from the British Isles. Music of John Dowland, William Byrd and John Johnson are featured, as well as old ballad tunes from England, Scotland and Wales.

Mr. Dowland's Midnight

John Dowland (1563-1626), the finest of all Elizabethan lute composers, was a contemporary of William Shakespeare and Queen Elizabeth I.

Ayreheart has rearranged and ornamented Mr. Dowland’s Midnight (originally a lute solo) for two lutes, colascione and percussion.

This track was recorded and mixed by Carr Designs at North Fourth studios.

Lully Lulle

Perhaps allegorical, "Lully Lulle" tells the tale of a dying knight tended at his bedside by a maiden.

The actual origins of the song are obscure, but likely reach back to at least the early 16th century.

This track was recorded and mixed by Carr Designs at North Fourth Studios.

Lyrics:

Lully lulle, the falcon hath born my mak away
He bare him off, he bare him down
He bare him into an orchard brown Lully lulle, the falcon hath born my mak away

In that orchard there was an hall
That was hanged with purple and pall
In that hall there was a bed
That was hanged with gold so red
Lully lulle, the falcon hath born my mak away

In that bed there lyeth a knight
His wound is bleeding day and night
By his bedside kneeleth a maid
She weepeth both night and day
Lully lulle, the falcon hath born my mak away

By his bedside standeth the stone Corpus Christi written thereon
Lully lulle, the falcon hath born my mak away

Twa Corbies

“Twa Corbies,” the Scottish version of “The Three Ravens,” was a Steeleye Span specialty (as well as being an Alfred Deller favorite). Death was more immediate and more present to the singers of traditional song; it still may be so. In any event, mementi mori, reminders of our eventual end, are everywhere in the tradition.

This track was recorded and mixed by Carr Designs at North Fourth studios.

Lyrics:
As I was walking all alane,
I spied twa corbies makin a mane;
The tane unto the ither did say-o,
“Whar sall we gang and dine the-day-o?”
“Doun by yon auld fail dyke,
There lies a new slain knight;
And nane do ken that he lies there-o,
But his hound, his hawk an his lady fair-o.”
“His hound is tae the huntin gane,
His hawk tae fetch the wild-fowl hame,
His lady’s tain anither mate,
So we may mak oor dinner swate.”
“Ye’ll sit on his white hause-bane,
And I’ll pike oot his bonny blue een;
Wi ae lock o his yellow hair-o
We’ll theek oor nest whan it grows bare-o.”
“Mony a one for him makes mane,
But nane sall ken whar he is gane;
Oer his white banes, whan they are bare-o,
The wind sall blaw for evermair.”
(translation):
As I was walking all alone,
I saw three crows (or ravens) making a moan; 
One said to the other,
“Where shall we go and dine today?”
“In behind that old turf wall,
There lies a newly slain knight;
And no one knows that he lies there,
But his hawk, his hound and his lady fair.”
“His hound is to the hunting gone,
His hawk to fetch the wild-fowl home, 
His lady has taken another mate,
So we may make our dinner sweet.” 
“You will sit on his white neck-bone, 
And I’ll peck out his pretty blue eyes; 
With one lock of his yellow hair
We’ll thatch our nest when it grows bare.” 
“Many a one for him is moaning,
But no one will know where he is gone; 
Over his white bones, when they are bare, 
The wind will blow for evermore.”

In a Garden so Green

“In a Garden So Green” may date back to 1682 in a Scottish collection of Songs & Fancies, but it also takes us back 25 years to the early days of the wonderful The Baltimore Consort, and one of their popular Scottish projects (also on Dorian) On the Banks of Helicon (DOR-90139).

This track was recorded and mixed by Carr Designs at North Fourth studios.

Lyrics:
In a garden so green, in a May morening
heard I my lady pleen
of paramours.
Said she, my love so sweet,
come you not yet nor yet?
Heght you not me to meet
amongst the owrs?
Elore, Elore, I love my lusty love, Elore lo.
The skies upspringis,
the dew down dingis,
the sweet larks singis
their hours of prime. 
Phoebus upsprentius, 
joy to rest wentis
lost mine intent is
and gone’s the time.
Elore, Elore, I love my lusty love, Elore lo.
Danger my dead is,
false fortune my feid is,
langour my leed is,
and hope I despair.
Disdaine my desyris,
so strangeness my feir is,
deceit out of weir is,
adew I fare.
Elore, Elore, I love my lusty love, Elore lo.
Then to my lady swyth
did I my presence kyth.
Saying, My bird be blyth,
am I not yours?
So in my arms two did
I my lusty jo
And kiss her tymis mo
then night hes hours,
Elore, Elore, I love my lusty love, Elore lo.

Black is the Color

"Black is the Color" was a traditional British ballad found by John Jacob Niles, a famous collector of traditional ballads. As the story goes, he fell in love with the text, but hated the melody that was attached to it, so he wrote a new one. Ayreheart performing his ‘re-written’ version here.

This track was recorded and mixed by Carr Designs at North Fourth Studios.

Lyrics:
Black is the color of my true Love’s hair,
Her face is something wondrous fair,
The brightest eyes and the daintiest hands, 
I love the ground whereon she stands.
I love my Love and well she knows,
I love the ground whereon she goes,
If she on Earth no more I see,
My life would quickly leave me.
Black is the color of my true Love’s hair,
Her face is something wondrous fair,
The brightest eyes and the daintiest hands, 
I love the ground whereon she stands.
I go to the Clyde to mourn, to weep,
Unsatisfied I never can sleep,
I’ll write you a song in a few short lines,
I’d suffer death a thousand times.
Black is the color of my true Love’s hair,
Her face is something wondrous fair,
The brightest eyes and the daintiest hands, 
I love the ground whereon she stands.

Ballo detto il Conte Orlando & Saltarello

My Lady Hunsdon's Puffe

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